5th September, 2006

Oracle Have A Half Open Kimono

Filed under: database — admin @ 12:17 pm

Sometimes I think that the nice people at Oracle get the new information technology world. Sometimes I even think that they understand the web and it’s associated technologies. Then they do something stupid.

The latest crime? Publishing syndication feeds of various columns on the Oracle Technology Network but then putting the content on a site that is only available to registered users.

I subscribed to the feed for Steven Feuerstein’s PL/SQL questions and answers. It is, of course, a headline and excerpt only field – a particular bĂȘte noire of mine – so I clicked on an article headline in my feed reader expecting to be taken to the relevant article. But no, the information architects have decreed that you can’t casually view this premium content, you have to sign in to with an oracle.com account.

People, it’s just the web. It’s not like I’m trying to buy anything. Why should I have to sign in to a web site to read an article on the overhead of DBMS_OUTPUT?

The only conclusion I can reach is that they really don’t get this here web thing, and that makes me sad.

In the interests of completeness the article I was referring to is here (have your oracle.com user name and password handy) and Steve’s conclusion is largely correct. Although I would recommend using a package like Log 4 pl/sql rather than rolling your own (inevitably) halfcooked logging solution.

4 Comments

  1. Yep. Just tried it and oracle.com sucks. On the plus side, it’s not as balkanised as IBM’s website.

    Comment by Alan Green — 05/09/2006 @ 7:52 pm

  2. Yep. Just tried it and oracle.com sucks. On the plus side, it’s not as balkanised as IBM’s website.

    Comment by Alan Green — 05/09/2006 @ 7:52 pm

  3. Very well said. I think it might be part of the knee-jerk “let’s demand a logon and password for *everything* – don’t ask what purpose it serves” custom that infects so many websites. (Well, I guess the purpose is usually to get your email address to mail ads to, but is that really worth putting a barrier in front of the information?)

    It’s funny, because I know that Oracle wants to evangelize. They asked me specifically to write an article to appeal to the un-Oraclized open-source community. Oh, well; no organization that big makes coherent decisions.

    Comment by Catherine Devlin — 07/09/2006 @ 1:05 am

  4. Very well said. I think it might be part of the knee-jerk “let’s demand a logon and password for *everything* – don’t ask what purpose it serves” custom that infects so many websites. (Well, I guess the purpose is usually to get your email address to mail ads to, but is that really worth putting a barrier in front of the information?)

    It’s funny, because I know that Oracle wants to evangelize. They asked me specifically to write an article to appeal to the un-Oraclized open-source community. Oh, well; no organization that big makes coherent decisions.

    Comment by Catherine Devlin — 07/09/2006 @ 1:05 am

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